Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Hating on Bernie and kicking out the homeless

Over at VICE, I report on how the influx of rich white people in downtown Los Angeles is impacting the poor homeless people who live there.
Meanwhile, at Salon I argue that, no, Bernie Sanders shouldn't run a pointless campaign for president that ends with him endorsing Hillary Clinton.
http://www.vice.com/read/gentrification-comes-to-las-skid-row-and-the-homeless-get-the-shaft

2 comments:

  1. Anonymous11:57 AM

    The defeat of Eric Cantor reminds us that elections often defy widespread expectations. How can the result of a Hillary Clinton vs. Bernie Sanders contest be predicted so far in advance?

    For several reasons, I believe Sanders should run as a Green.

    Firstly, most Democrats like him the way they liked Dennis Kucinich: readily admitting they agreed with him the most but somehow convinced his proposals are unpopular despite a mountain of polling data that demonstrates otherwise. Sanders would be better off reaching out to Americans who have given up on the major parties or never trusted either. I believe Sanders would have great appeal among such people, most of whom surely have not given thought his inadequate criticism of Obama's military policy. If this flaw were to attract attention, I believe that people will understand that for Sanders to get anything done in the Senate, he must compromise with the Democrats. Moreover, Sanders will have the chance to lay out what his own military policy would be as president.

    Secondly, the credibility Sanders would bring to the Green Party would be of enormous help to building the alternative that I believe is necessary and can win when this nation reaches its breaking point. After all, an NBC/WSJ poll in October found more Americans favoring a generic independent/third-party candidate than favoring a generic Republican for the US House of Reps. (http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304527504579167853049782242)

    Thirdly, as you seem to agree, the Democratic Party cannot be salvaged, especially not by one candidacy or even by one president. If Sanders were elected as a Democrat, he would have to deal with a Congress that's about as opposed to his ideas as it is now. If he were elected as a Green, he would presumably bring some Greens into Congress on his coattails.

    I believe Sanders has a large enough following to have a much easier time obtaining the signatures to get on state ballots than the last few Green presidential nominees did. Moreover, he would not need to be on all 51 ballots to run a serious campaign, which could achieve a victory just by obtaining 5% of the popular vote, as that is the threshold for major-party status under federal election law, allowing easier ballot access and more matching funds later.

    Who do you believe should run?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous7:14 PM

      oh for sure man

      Delete